THE VARIATION IN ENCYCLIA TAMPENSIS





Other Florida Native Orchids


This photograph is of a plant observed in the western Everglades. It
appears to be a different species from what was originally found in the
eastern Everglades. This may be a new species.

The following photographs were taken in the Fakahatchee Strand
in early November, 1998, by Jesse Fernandez while on a class
field trip during a class sponsored by the South Florida Orchid Society.



Epidendrum nocturnum is common in South Florida. It is usually autogamous
(flowers self-pollinate) and sometimes cliestogamous (flowers self-pollinate
before they open).


This species is called Epidendrum difforme, however it does not match the
type of E. difforme and apears to be a new species (it is in the process of
being given a new name.


Epidendrum anceps usually flowers year-round with clusters of brownish-yellow
flowers. It is common in South Florida.


Epidendrum rigidum is another very common species in South Florida.


This is Anachielium cochleatum var. triandrum. Many people still call this
species Encyclia. The true encyclias are species like Encyclia tampensis.


A true leafless orchid at maturity. Campylocentrum pachyrrhizum is one of three
"ghost" orchids in Florida.


This is one of the most spectacular orchids in Florida. Polyrrhiza lindenii
produces a single large white flower in July. This is the largest specimen
that I have seen.

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